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Science, Philosophy, and Religion in the Embryo Debate (Audio)

Science, Philosophy, and Religion in the Embryo Debate - Robert George

Professor Robert George, the McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University, delivers the Anscombe Memorial Lecture for 2011 at St John's College in Oxford.

© The Anscombe Bioethics Centre.

It’s Mother’s Day; Be Selfish (Video)

It’s Mother’s Day; Be Selfish -- Bryan Caplan

In an interview for AEI's magazine The American Bryan Caplan outlines a few reasons why he believes it is less work and better for society for parents to have more children.

© American Enterprise Institute

Free Will (Audio)

Free Will -- Thomas Pink

We often blame people for what they do or fail to do. But that implies that they were free to choose whether or not to act in the way they did. At the same time science seems to reveal prior causes of all our actions. There seems little or no room for free will.  In this episode of Philosophy Bites Thomas Pink, author of Free Will: A Very Short Introduction, discusses the Free Will Problem and outlines his own approach to it.

© Philosophy Bites

Does Quantum Physics Have Anything Significant to Tell Us About Religion? (Video)

Does quantum physics have anything significant to tell us about religion? -- Richard Swineburn

Swineburn discusses the importance of analogy in both quantum physics and in religion.

© John Templeton Foundation (West Conshohocken, PA)

Robert P. George at Toledo College of Law (Video)

Robert P. George at Toledo College of Law

‘[O]ne’s knowledge of Natural Law…begins with experience but it does not end or even tarry there’. So begins Robert George’s lecture on the basic principles of Natural Law theory.

© World News Network

The Affinity of Politics and Literature: The Moral Imagination in the Public Square (Video)

The Affinity of Politics and Literature: The Moral Imagination in the Public Square -- David M. Whalen

Aristotle once observed that rational argumentation often serves little purpose if one's imagination has not been well-formed.  David M. Whalen talks about the importance of literature in forming the moral imagination, arguing that 'if Western Civilisation is in some kind of spiritual, moral, intellectual and cultural distress and decline', then it is only in the last analysis through the forming of the moral imagination, rather than the use of the order of law, that a true reanimation of the culture can come.

© Intercollegiate Studies Institute (Wilmington, DE)

Have We Forgotten the Meaning of Charity? (Audio)

Have We Forgotten the Meaning of Charity? -- BBC Radio 4: Moral Maze

Michael Buerk and guests discuss the Government’s plans to allow charities to run public services.  Is this an efficient or desirable way for public services to be run?  Will such a move prove an effective way of rolling back the frontiers of the State, or will blurring the boundaries between the State and charities destroy the altruism which characterises charitable work?

© British Broadcasting Corporation (London)

Wikileaks Ethics (Video)

Wikileaks Ethics -- PBS Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

Contributors discuss the ethical dimensions of Government secrecy and the Wikileaks scandal.

© Educational Broadcasting Corporation

Tax Justice (Video)

Tax Justice -- PBS Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

Contributors, including Michael Sandel of Harvard University, and Peter Wehner of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, discuss the morality of different approaches to taxation.

© Educational Broadcasting Corporation

Law Without a Lawgiver? The Courts and Natural Rights (Video)

Law Without a Lawgiver? The Courts and Natural Rights -- Francis Beckwith

Francis Beckwith looks at how Federal Courts in the U.S. treat religious claims in the courts as possible claims of knowledge, before going on to examine the wider philosophical issue of whether we can have objective knowledge of natural moral norms.

© Intercollegiate Studies Institute (Wilmington, DE)